Soccer World Cup 2010

 

Quotes about Soccer World Cup 2010

Crime quotes
Racism
Rumours of Fifa moving the Cup from South Africa
Mbeki quotes
Sepp Blatter quotes
Michael Palmer quotes
Urban legends
Cape Town

 


Lungile Madywabe
23 October 2006

"The original costs were pegged at just less than R2-billion for construction of new stadiums and the upgrade of existing ones. For example, Newlands in Cape Town and King's Park (Absa Stadium) in Durban -- traditionally rugby grounds -- were going to get facelifts...In a country where the government has to justify public expenditure, the construction of five new world-class stadiums may appear profligate. Especially when compared with the need for better health facilities, provision of clean water and access to electricity for all, new education centres and improved public transport for millions of South Africans. " Lungile Madywabe - Business Day - 2006-10-23


Joshua Caucutt
October 2006

"I attended the 2006 World Cup in Germany. I met many others who took the trip and had a great time. I have yet to meet one person who is planning to make the 18 hr flight to South Africa." Joshua Caucutt from Maranatha Baptist Bible College

Lionel Mtshali
5 October 2006

"The single biggest advantage of hosting the event will therefore be admitting openly something most of us have known all along but have been too polite or inhibited to talk about in public. At last, we will be free to identify and indict our public sector as a bloated and inefficient impost on the taxpayers’ back, and essentially unfit to drive the country’s socioeconomic development. " Lionel Mtshali


Cathal Kelly
5 October 2006

"It's stating the obvious to say that South African soccer has little need for — and even less ability to maintain — 10 enormous facilities after the summer of 2010." Cathal Kelly


Cathal Kelly
5 October 2006

"South Africa's effort has been plagued by organizational snafus, spiralling costs and the general feeling that a developing nation is not up to the task of hosting the world's biggest sporting event." Cathal Kelly

Michael Tarr
28 September 2006

"According to Dennis Mumble, director of the Local Organising Committee, stadium managers and the construction industry are caught in a dilemma because they want to start as soon as possible but they have to ensure that funds are allocated properly."

IOL article
24 September 2006

"While the bid book anticipated construction costs of R2-billion, that amount was now put at R9.1-billion. Provisional costs included R1.1bn each for the Nelson Mandela Stadium in Port Elizabeth, and the Polokwane and Mbombela stadiums in Nelspruit. The King Senzangakhona Stadium was expected to cost R1.7bn; Cape Town's Green Point Stadium between R2.3bn and R3.3bn; and the FNB upgrade between R1.2bn and R1.5bn."

Michael Duffy
2 September 2006

"You rose from your bed in the early hours to spend an hour and a half watching the ball move from one player to another several hundred times without passing through the white posts at either end of the field more than once or twice. It was like golf without the excitement." Michael Duffy writing in the Sydney Morning Herald

George A. Pieler and Jens F. Laurson
August 2006

"With the Cup spotlight on southern Africa, this is a rare chance to shame Mugabe into meeting minimal standards of modern civilised governance in treating his people. Ending “land reform” (confiscation for the benefit of Mugabe cronies), respecting political opposition, regularising elections, and freeing up an independent judiciary are the least the world should expect from Zimbabwe. For that matter, so long as the South African venue remains in question at all, why not pressure President Thabo Mbeki to stop giving economic support and tactical aid and comfort to the Mugabe regime?" George A. Pieler and Jens F. Laurson writing for Business Day

Robin Palmer
August 2006

"What about the people who stay here? Basically we are spending all this money on foreigners and, when the event is over and they all leave, there will be a huge post-natal depression," Robin Palmer, a professor at the Law faculty of the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Robin Palmer
August 2006

"There are always funds for projects like this but not for things like employing more Metro Police or housing street children. To spend R5-billion for a three-week sporting event, but not on crucial services like housing, shows that the priorities are skewed", Robin Palmer, a professor at the Law faculty of the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

David Carte
August 2006

"This is a one-in-a-lifetime opportunity to build and unify the nation. It matters not that Bafana Bafana is unlikely to win a game." David Carte writing in Moneyweb

David Williams
August 2006

"It beats me how they can call it 'the beautiful game' when so many matches are decided on a crude and depressing penalty shootout. " David Williams writing for Upfront, the British Airways in-flight magazine

David Williams
August 2006

"Rugby has very complicated laws which the authorities are always trying to simplify. soccer has very simple rules which the referees at the World Cup seemed to do their best to complicate and misinterpret." David Williams writing for Upfront, the British Airways in-flight magazine

David Williams
August 2006

"Then there's the celebration by the players when a goal is scored. They pile on top of each other, dance, slide across the grass, pull their shirts over their heads, kiss. It verges on indecent. But I suppose you can't blame them for getting so turned on, because goals are so rare." David Williams writing for Upfront, the British Airways in-flight magazine

David Williams
August 2006

"In rugby, a man's game, it's quite the reverse. We always try to play on, even when we've broken a limb or are seriously concussed. The greater the pain the more we try to hide it. Minor injuries are simply ignored. Contrast that with these soccer billionaires who lie on the grass shrieking in agony and then (free kick or yellow card having been given) recover miraculously and trot about as if nothing had happened (which, of course, it often hadn't." David Williams writing for Upfront, the British Airways in-flight magazine

David Williams
August 2006

"My strongest impression from a month of interminable soccer is that the players are all crooks and they get away with it. Not only do they obstruct the opposition, pull jerseys, simulate injuries and pretend they've been fouled, this all seems to be accepted as part of the game. It's only the quality of the acting that differentiates the criminals from the good guys." David Williams writing for Upfront, the British Airways in-flight magazine

Bantu Holimisa
18 July 2006

"On behalf of the UDM and my family we wish Madiba many more years. We hope that God will keep him to watch the 2010."

Kabelo Selema
10 July 2006

"The work involved in getting ready will be an economic injection for the country that will help provide much-needed jobs for people." Kabelo Selema, who heads the justice and peace department at the Southern African Catholic Bishops' Conference.

Moloko Temo
7 July 2006

"I wish I can live to see the 2010 Soccer World Cup (in South Africa). Everyone here is talking about it." Moloko Temo said at her 132nd birthday birthday party in Mohodi village in South Africa's northern province of Limpopo.

Danny Jordaan
2 July 2006

"Claims that South Africa could lose the host right for the international soccer showpiece were "laughable" and "absolute nonsense," said Danny Jordaan, the chief executive of the South African Local Organizing Committee.

Saffey Ismail
June 2006

"South Africans are so much more friendly than Europeans, and our message must be that they should come to South Africa to enjoy themselves and enjoy a lifestyle unknown to Europeans." Saffey Ismail

Charlie Dempsey
June 2006

"I never thought the World Cup was so important to so many people." Charlie Dempsey, who's vote against the instructions of the Oceania federation he was representing, handed the Soccer World Cup 2006 to Germany instead of South Africa (Dempsey resigned from his post a few days later).

Tokyo Sexwale
28 June 2006

"The flames of racism, ignited by a minority at soccer matches cannot and must not be allowed to divide the family of football." Tokyo Sexwale a member of the South African Local Organising Committee.

Colm Allan
28 June 2006

"While the PSAM recognises that it may be important for national sports department officials and those directly involved in the technical planning and management of facilities for the 2010 World Cup to attend, there is absolutely no justification for Eastern Cape provincial and local government politicians to do so." Colm Allan of the Public Service Accountability Monitor criticised the trip which a 14-member Eastern Cape delegation were undertaking to Germany.

Gert Oosthuizen
27 June 2006

"The 2010 FIFA World Cup should be based on philosophy of the collective, of the community as opposed to individualism. Individualism can only lead to selfishness and tensions," said Sport and Recreation Deputy Minister Gert Oosthuizen.

Maureen J.N Ogbah
27 June 2006

"I look forward to 2010 with hope for Nigeria. The country has the capacity to produce good players, provided there is an expert, who will train them on skills rather than employing tribalism to raise a squad...But people like Galadima must leave so that we have a hitch free administration of football under a result-oriented Nigerian Football Association." Maureen J.N Ogbah, a Nigerian football analyst.

Ouma
June 2006

“It was nice to see four new African nations reach the finals. No nation has a divine right to qualify for the finals. There are now about ten African nations with World Cup experience so it could work well for 2010.” Ouma

Pierre
June 2006

“Nigeria have a very good young team and Cameroon should be back in the hunt. Senegal are very strong-willed and South Africa will have qualified automatically so I see a very competitive qualifying campaign. There is so much at stake this time – all of Africa wants to be at the home party.” Pierre from Cameroon

Ivan Hurtado
June 2006

"I feel very privileged to have experienced all this. We’re a little sad to be going home but we can hold our heads up high when we get there. Now we’ve got to make sure we qualify for South Africa 2010. European teams don’t improvise much. They play a simple, direct game, but they don’t take any risks." Ivan Hurtado (Ecuador player at Soccer World Cup 2006).

Patrick Manning
26 June 2006

"We must be among the favourites in the next World Cup," he told the festive crowd. Prime Minister Patrick Manning of Trinidad and Tobago explaining that qualifying for Soccer World Cup 2010 was a national imperative.

Sepp Blatter
26 June 2006

"They will do well. They will do well and they have all the population behind them, like here in Germany but even more I would say because it will be the competition, the World Cup in 2010, that will finally bring the total integration of the people of South Africa." Sepp Blatter's reply on being asked whether he thought South Africa would put on a good show in 2010.

Mark Starr
26 June 2006

"There is demonstrably more first-class talent in Africa than ever. When World Cup 2010 is held in South Africa, its impact should arrive full force." Mark Starr

Bruce Arena
25 June 2006

"I have no doubts in (my) mind I can qualify a team (for the 2010 World Cup). But that to me is not the whole job." Team USA coach Bruce Arena

Michael Grant
25 June 2006

"South African observers at these finals could be forgiven for feeling a sense of dread at the logistical headache of being hosts. Fifa have projected that the sale of television rights for the next finals will generate £1.2 billion, compared to £1bn this time, but responsibilities and pressures are also continuing to grow." Michael Grant reporting in the Sunday Herald.

Lee Young-Pyo
June 2006

"I’m very upset about the game and I think the second goal was very strange. We all stopped playing because we thought the linesman had flagged. We have to go and prepare for the 2010 World Cup." Lee Young-Pyo (Korea)

Tumi Makabo
24 June 2006

"Not many South African football fans have internet access. I need to take my experiences and learning from Germany and adapt it to our own situation,” Tumi Makabo, the South African Local Organising Committee Communications Director.

Kim So-yun
24 June 2006

"The moment the referee acknowledged it as a goal, I cried utterly because it was too unfair. He just turned a deaf ear to our claim. I will go to the 2010 World Cup in person to cheer on our team,'' Kim So-yun, 17, still on the verge of tears. 

Rick Morrissey
24 June 2006

"...in a tournament that has been full of incredible athleticism, the U.S. team lacked toughness. Would a U.S. team member like to start lifting weights? That probably would be a good idea for 2010. Did you happen to check out the upper bodies of the Ghana players? Think that might help a little while battling for the ball?", Rick Morrissey reporting for the Mercury News.

Dan Nied
24 June 2006

"As the last team with a chance to stir national pride, the Americans went to Germany and played like tourists, just happy to be a part of the spectacle. Their chance to grow the game in their homeland went to the wayside with Ghana's penalty kick. We begged for heroes to break into our living rooms, shedding the shackles of anonymity, but no player was willing to grab the spotlight even in the mild way Alexi Lalas did at the 1994 World Cup. Donovan was the most likely to posterize the sport, but he seemed to blend in with the grass more than anything else. He was silent, so was his team, and so is USA Soccer until 2010. That is the next time the sport will have full attention of the American public. Maybe by then, they'll find a way to capitalize on their chances." Dan Nied, reporting in Journal Advocate

Maureen Dowd
24 June 2006

"The United States was not one of the eight teams seeded in the first round of the World Cup, something that folks like Bruce Arena apparently never quite got over. Those silly FIFA rankings aside, it appears that the formula that took into account the pitiful U.S. performance in France in 1998 could again rear its ugly head four years hence when (if?) the U.S. qualifies for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

The results, and the first round exit, in Germany could again consign the U.S. team to a first round group strikingly similar to the one this time around. So get ready for more hand wringing and complaints. The only sure-fire solution: Play well in the World Cup, when the games really matter, and not in empty friendlies against Wales, Latvia, etc." Maureen Dowd

Greg
June 2006

"You have this crazy thing, where, like, you, Scotland and Wales and Ireland have to play separately. You just don't marshal your resources properly. We can't understand it. Well, we're not desperately federalist - but it's certainly something for us to consider for 2010. Which, by the way, I'm hearing won't be in South Africa because of security concerns. But they want to keep it in Africa, so it's going to be in Dubai." Greg Tahibia a St Louis engineer

Saturday Star
19 June 2006

"At this World Cup, we have seen the emergence of young players such as Cristiano Ronaldo of Portugal, Kaka of Brazil and Wayne Rooney of England, who has been his team's star, even though he has played for only a few minutes. In just about every team the stars have been the youngsters, and all of them will be in their prime in South Africa in 2010." Saturday Star

Lagahi Digbeu Sylvain
June 2006

''For a long time nobody spoke about African football, but the word is coming. We have many difficulties. We have guns, but no food or medicine. Football is a good thing. When the world watches Ivory Coast, they see us playing, not fighting.'' Lagahi Digbeu Sylvain, a fan from the Ivory Coast. `

Luis Oliveira Goncalves
June 2006

''Unfortunately on our continent we have other priorities like health, education and development which are consuming our budget,'' Angola coach Luis Oliveira Goncalves.

Public Service Accountability Monitor statement
June 2006

"While... it may be important for national sports department officials and those directly involved in the technical planning and management of facilities for the 2010 World Cup to attend the current World Cup in Germany, there is absolutely no justification for Eastern Cape provincial and local government politicians to do so." Public Service Accountability Monitor statement

John Howard
June 2006

"It is a great sporting moment," said Prime Minister John Howard after Australia clawed their way back to a 2-2 draw against Croatia to send them to the 2nd round of the Soccer World Cup for the first time.

Suzanne Wenga
June 2006

“I have watched all the African teams which have been playing so far and I have been impressed. The next World Soccer Cup in 2010 is a long way and by then I think most teams would have corrected the mistakes they made during this World Soccer Cup tournament. Possibly the World Soccer Cup will remain in Africa.” Suzanne Wenga, a soccer fan from Cameroon and based in Germany.

Omar Boukari
June 2006

"I have decided to stop watching soccer. It is better for me to study my books than to get hurt by such results. I get so emotional and disturbed especially with the way some Referees handle the matches.” Omar Boukari, a student from Ivory Coast and studying in Germany explaining that he was disappointed with Ivory Coast because he expected the team to advance to the quarter finals.

Henny Engels
June 2006

"We don't think soccer fans go to prostitutes more often than other men. It's about the quantity of men . . . not the quality", Henny Engels, National Council of German Women's Organizations

Charlie Brooker
16 June 2006

"...an overhyped moneyspinning festival of tedium in which the world's thickest millionaires kick a rubbish ball round a poxy field to the wonderment of an audience of foghorning cretins." Charlie Brooker writing for The Guardian

Timothy Kalyegira
16 June 2006

"The predominantly Black Brazilian team which is the most successful nation so far in World Cup history, makes Brazil the substitute Africa, the uncle who can become your substitute role model when your father's alcoholism shames your family." Timothy Kalyegira

Timothy Kalyegira
16 June 2006

"Moreover, since the first World Cup finals in 1930, all the winners of this much-coveted title have been countries where the majority of the population is White and, apart from England and Germany, all predominantly Roman Catholic nations. (Yes, Brazil is about 60 percent White in racial composition)." Timothy Kalyegira

Timothy Kalyegira
16 June 2006

"Typically, even the coaches of the African teams are White men, a reminder of the White expatriates who come and take over our jobs and get paid ten times the amount that we are paid; the vast majority of the African players who represent their national teams are based, for their club football, in Europe, the continent of their colonial masters (akin to the flow of Africa's best talent to Europe and North America)." Timothy Kalyegira

Timothy Kalyegira
16 June 2006

"Live on television through these matches, the African sees his frustrating life played out. The African has business ideas but there is never the capital; he hopes to pursue advanced studies but he can't secure the scholarship; he applies for a job for which he is well qualified but he is overtaken by applicants from politically connected tribes; he starts up an enterprise but it is bought out or out-competed by a multinational European giant." Timothy Kalyegira

Timothy Kalyegira
16 June 2006

"These losses in Germany (and the failure of the 1990 and 2002 quarter finalists Cameroon and Senegal respectively to sustain their past quarter final showings), brought back to millions of fans that familiar sinking feeling that most Africans live with - the limits and frustrating obstacles in the path of almost everything an African endeavours to do. This is why Africans take the defeat of their teams at the World Cup finals so personal." Timothy Kalyegira, 16 June 2006

Franz Beckenbauer
June 2006

"England, please no!" Franz Beckenbauer hoping that Germany are not paired with England in the last 16 of the Soccer World Cup.

Muammar Gaddafi
June 2006

"Fifa was founded to create love among the population of the earth, but all it has done is spread and deepen feelings of hostility and hatred all over the world, even among friends...Fifa reactivated the system of slavery and enslavement and trading in human beings from Africa to Europe and America... " Muammar Gaddafi

Tony Twine
June 2006

"It's going to be like the Rugby World Cup, the Cricket World Cup and the World Summit at the same time. I'm not sure we're going to cope with it." Tony Twine, Econometrix senior economist, reflecting on South Africa's ability to cope with the Soccer World Cup 2010.

Abedi Pele
June 2006

"There's no lack of good players in Ghana. In terms of technique and pace we're without doubt the best in Africa. Lately, we've made a lot of progress in the finer points of tactics as well, which was our weak point before." Abedi Pele (67 caps for Ghana, three-time African Player of the Year)

Dennis Mumble
June 2006

"The German LOC couldn't get a politician to take a ticket. They have a €40 (about R340) limit on gifts they're allowed to accept and a VIP ticket for a World Cup match is easily worth around €150 (about R1 100), so German politicians are afraid they'll get creamed by the public if they accept a complimentary ticket." the German politicians' disciplined stance coming as a shock to Dennis Mumble who, as the manager of the Soccer City Stadium, is used to outrageous demands from South African politicians for dozens of VIP tickets for games at Soccer City.

Moses Chikane
June 2006

"Soccer is a game for the people and if you say we need to have a Mastercard to buy a ticket how do you get one if you don't even have a bank account? We need to consider that Africa is not Europe." Moses Chikane, a former South African MP and the South Africa's ambassador in Germany.

David Runciman
Monday 29th May 2006

"...success in African football seems to be distributed more or less at random. It comes and it goes, without leaving any deep roots behind".

PATRICK VAN RENSBURG
27th May 2006

"...it's probably just as well that they lost this series to the Germans by the single vote of a grumpy old New Zealander. They would probably have lost the first round as they lost the first round of the Africa Chip Cup in Egypt".

Franz Beckenbauer
April 2006

"In 2010 South Africa will not have anything to say in their own country". Beckenbauer pointing out his view that the German 2006 Organising Committee would be the last that still had something to say in the way the World Cup was organised as FIFA was trying to completely take over the running of things.

Nelson Mandela
15 May 2004

"I feel like a young man of 15...South Africans should treat this decision with humility and without arrogance because we are, after all, equal," Nelson Mandela said, without being able to hide his tears from the cameras after South Africa won the right to host the Soccer World Cup 2010.

Gary Lineker

"Football is a game played by 22 players. And then Germany win."

Franz Beckenbauer

"With the east now joining us, we'll be unbeatable", Franz Beckenbauer

Socrates

"It's part of our culture. It's just the way we are. Football, above anything else, brings Brazilians together, more than our language, more than our flag. The productivity of this country improves by 50% when a popular team wins. " Brazil's Socrates.

Socrates

"Beauty comes first. Victory is secondary. What matters is joy." Brazil's Socrates.

Falcao

"I remember tiny details of that Italy game: my goal, the funereal atmosphere in the dressing room, the front page of a Sao Paulo newspaper which had no headline, no writing, nothing but a picture of a child crying. Many of us played on for Brazil after that, but the Italy game was never mentioned." Falcao on Brazil's loss to Italy in the 1982 World Cup.

Lev Yashin

"Have a smoke to calm your nerves, then toss back a strong drink to tone your muscles." the USSR's Lev Yashin on the secret for developing reflexes like his.

Johan Cruyff

"I'm not religious. In Spain all 22 players make the sign of the cross before they enter the pitch. If it works all matches must therefore end in a draw." Johan Cruyff

Tarcisio Burgnich
1970

"I told myself before the game that he's made of skin and bones just like everyone else - but I was wrong." Italian Defender Tarciso Burgnich who marked Pelé in the 1970 World Cup.

Barbosa

"Under Brazilian law, the maximum sentence is 30 years; but my imprisonment has been for 50." Brazil's goalkeeper, Barbosa, who was blamed for the defeat against Uruguay in the 1950 World Cup final.

Stanley Rous
1952.

“If this can be termed the century of the common man, then soccer, of all sports, is surely his game." Stanley Rous.

References

October 2006

Readers: Not Sold on South Africa 2010

5 October 2006

5 October 2006

28 September 2006

Rising costs, Chiefs in trouble - what's new?

24 September 2006

2010 stadiums to cost much more - report

2 September 2006

Jig is up - give World Cup the boot

31 August 2006

'World Cup won't be switched'

31 August 2006

New Zealand ready if FIFA move 2010 World Cup

31 August 2006

World Cup 2010: could the winner be . . . Sydney?

29 August 2006

Fifa has to call Zimbabwe’s bluff 

18 August 2006

SA's World Cup spending slammed

17 August 2006

OLE! OLE! OLE! FOR 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa

21 July 2006

Fergie backs SA for successful World Cup

21 July 2006

Top officials challenge stadium estimates

18 July 2006

88 wishes for our beloved Madiba

12 July 2006

2010 World Cup will aid host South Africa, bishops' official says

7 July 2006

S. African granny, 132, may be world's oldest

 

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